2019/10/21 14:29

○Experience as a Japanese Teacher○

LIFE
All for the sake of students. Playing an active role every day with 3 hours of sleep. — An interview with Ms. Kazuyo Tezuka
Kazuyo Tezuka
Kazuyo Tezuka
She majored in Japanese-language education in a graduate school in Korea. After returning to Japan, she received the Japanese Language Teaching certificate after 420 hours of training. She has 4 years of experience in teaching Japanese and 3 years of experience in teaching Korean.

Why did you become a Japanese teacher?
When I was in university, I was the president of the Tutoring Club. I was able to increase communications with students from abroad, and a few foreign students had told me “Why don’t you become a Japanese teacher?” However, I wasn’t aware of that back then. I then went on an exchange to Korea, the place that I was interested in. I was so into Korea that I started to look for ways to avoid having to come back. At the end I figured that I could stay there with a student visa and thus made up my mind to enter graduate school. The only faculty I could enter was the faculty of Japanese Language Education. Upon graduation, it was hard to find a job in Japan, so I decided to become a Japanese teacher instead of working at a company.

What makes the job as a Japanese teacher worth doing?
The best moments are when the students tell me “Oh, I got it!” or “”Your classes are interesting”. I see their reactions right away, so it’s exciting every day for good or for bad. In addition, they often ask me questions that I have never thought of from the Japanese perspective, so I have learned a lot as I get to see things differently.

Dreams for the Future
My goal is to become a person with “healing power” ♪
I hope to become a person that always has something to spare in many aspects.

A message for future Japanese teachers
It may sound strict, but people who want their own time should not do this job. You cannot really draw a line between private life and the job. In addition, you will not be able to do it for long if you just want to use it as a means to go abroad. You should call it a few years of rigorous training rather than work. You would be worried about how to make the lessons more interesting and how to make them easier to understand every day. (In my case I was teaching at 3 different schools, and the average time of sleep I got was 3 hours). There are also many problems other than the lessons! If you still feel “I want to do it for sure!” even so, please become a Japanese teacher by all means. I support you from the bottom of my heart.
All for the sake of students. Playing an active role every day with 3 hours of sleep. — An interview with Ms. Kazuyo Tezuka
Kazuyo Tezuka
Kazuyo Tezuka
She majored in Japanese-language education in a graduate school in Korea. After returning to Japan, she received the Japanese Language Teaching certificate after 420 hours of training. She has 4 years of experience in teaching Japanese and 3 years of experience in teaching Korean.

Why did you become a Japanese teacher?
When I was in university, I was the president of the Tutoring Club. I was able to increase communications with students from abroad, and a few foreign students had told me “Why don’t you become a Japanese teacher?” However, I wasn’t aware of that back then. I then went on an exchange to Korea, the place that I was interested in. I was so into Korea that I started to look for ways to avoid having to come back. At the end I figured that I could stay there with a student visa and thus made up my mind to enter graduate school. The only faculty I could enter was the faculty of Japanese Language Education. Upon graduation, it was hard to find a job in Japan, so I decided to become a Japanese teacher instead of working at a company.

What makes the job as a Japanese teacher worth doing?
The best moments are when the students tell me “Oh, I got it!” or “”Your classes are interesting”. I see their reactions right away, so it’s exciting every day for good or for bad. In addition, they often ask me questions that I have never thought of from the Japanese perspective, so I have learned a lot as I get to see things differently.

Dreams for the Future
My goal is to become a person with “healing power” ♪
I hope to become a person that always has something to spare in many aspects.

A message for future Japanese teachers
It may sound strict, but people who want their own time should not do this job. You cannot really draw a line between private life and the job. In addition, you will not be able to do it for long if you just want to use it as a means to go abroad. You should call it a few years of rigorous training rather than work. You would be worried about how to make the lessons more interesting and how to make them easier to understand every day. (In my case I was teaching at 3 different schools, and the average time of sleep I got was 3 hours). There are also many problems other than the lessons! If you still feel “I want to do it for sure!” even so, please become a Japanese teacher by all means. I support you from the bottom of my heart.